Monthly Archives: November 2014

Thoughts for today and everyday

I will give thanks to the LORD with my whole heart; I will recount all of your wonderful deeds. I will be glad and exult in you; I will sing praise to your name, O Most High. (Psalm 9:1-2 ESV)

Wheat at En Dor. Photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

Wheat at En Dor. Photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

Do not be anxious about anything. Instead, in every situation, through prayer and petition with thanksgiving, tell your requests to God. (Philippians 4:6 NET)

Grapes at Lachish. Photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

Grapes at Lachish. Photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

 

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Mount Arbel and the Sea of Galilee

Our photo today was made from NW of the Sea of Galilee. The formation on the right is known as Mount Arbel. The agricultural area you see slopes down to the Plain of Gennesaret which stretches about 2½ miles to the Sea (Matthew 14:34).

View of Mount Arbel and the Sea of Galilee from the NW. Photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

View of Mount Arbel and the Sea of Galilee from the NW. Photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

Across the Sea of Galilee is a portion of the Golan Heights, known in Old Testament times as Bashan. This territory was taken by Israel from Og the king of Bashan and eventually became territory belonging to the tribe of Manasseh.

Then they turned and went up by the way to Bashan. And Og the king of Bashan came out against them, he and all his people, to battle at Edrei. But the LORD said to Moses, “Do not fear him, for I have given him into your hand, and all his people, and his land. And you shall do to him as you did to Sihon king of the Amorites, who lived at Heshbon.” So they defeated him and his sons and all his people, until he had no survivor left. And they possessed his land. (Numbers 21:33-35 ESV)

A city within the territory of Bashan was named Golan, and became one of the Israelite Cities of Refuge (Joshua 20:8).

Mount Arbel has its own history outside the Biblical text, but I will save that for another time.

“Sunrise, sunset…”

In response to our recent sunset photos on the Sea of Galilee Mark Hoffman sent a beautiful photo of a sunrise from Ein Bokek, a resort site located on the southern end of the west shore of the Dead Sea. When I asked Professor Hoffman for permission to elevate his photo to a post, he graciously granted it. The photo was made in January, 2014.

Sunrise on the Dead Sea from Ein Bokek. Photo by Mark Vitalis Hoffman.

Sunrise on the Dead Sea from Ein Bokek. Photo by Mark Vitalis Hoffman.

The Mountains of Moab are visible to the East in the modern country of Jordan, and reflected in the waters of the Dead Sea.

The Dead Sea is known as the Salt Sea in Genesis 14:3.

Mark Hoffman writes a practical blog for teachers and preacher who use any sort of technology. It is called Biblical Studies and Technological Tools. The subtitle is “From scroll to screen… codex to computer….” There you will find lots of helpful material relating to Bible software programs.

Last year I recommended two of his posts to my tour group. Others might enjoy these picture taking tips.

Thanks to Mark for sharing this beautiful photo.

Another sunset photo on the Sea of Galilee

In response to our recent post on Sunset from En Gev on the Sea of Galilee here, Randy Myers tried to post an image of a photo he made of a sunset on the Sea of Galilee about two weeks ago.

I contacted Randy and asked permission to post his photo on the blog. It is a beautiful photo with Tiberias in the shadows. The bird in flight adds a really nice touch.

Sunset on the Sea of Galilee. Photo by Randy Myers.

Sunset on the Sea of Galilee. Photo by Randy Myers.

Much of the activity of Jesus during His earthly ministry involved the Sea of Galilee and the various ports on its shore. Here is one example.

After Jesus healed a man with a withered hand on the Sabbath, the Pharisees and the Herodians made a plan to destroy Him.

Jesus withdrew with his disciples to the sea, and a great crowd followed, from Galilee and Judea and Jerusalem and Idumea and from beyond the Jordan and from around Tyre and Sidon. When the great crowd heard all that he was doing, they came to him. (Mark 3:7-8 ESV)

Randy, thanks for sharing this photo with us.

 

Sunset from En Gev on the Sea of Galilee

Travelers to the Sea of Galilee are always delighted to get a sunrise photo from Tiberias. If you travel around the lake to the eastern shore in the late afternoon you might see two things. Because the winds from the Mediterranean come from the north east you might see the stormy waves on the sea. And you might see a beautiful sunset.

The photo below is made from Kibbutz En Gev. The small village, home to some of the fishing and touring boats that ply the Sea of Galilee, is located in the shadow of the impressive mound of Hippos (Susita).

Sunset from En Gev. Photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

Sunset from En Gev. Photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

The harbor of Hippos (Susita) is located immediately south of En Gev. It is one of 15 or more ancient harbors now known to have existed in the time of Jesus.

Heavy rains bring flooding at Qumran

Jack Sasson, the Agade list, passes along a video about heavy rains Sunday in the area of Qumran on the shore of the Dead Sea in the Wilderness of Judea. (I think the rain was mostly in the Judean mountains.)

The video by אביחי שורשן is posted on YouTube.

Qumran is where the Dead Sea Scrolls were found in 1947.

This video reminds me of the fortunate experience I had in April 2006 when strong rains in the central mountain range caused floods in the wilderness near Saint George Monastery on Wadi Qelt. Read about it, and see more photos, here.

Floods in the desert of Judea overlooking Wadi Qelt at St. George Monastery. Photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

Floods in the Judea wilderness near St. George Monastery. Photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

Prof. Yossi Garfinkel speaks in Tampa

Prof. Yossi Garfinkel speaks at Florida College

Prof. Yossi Garfinkel speaks at Florida College

Yosef Garfinkel is head of the Berman Center for Biblical Archaeology at Hebrew University in Jerusalem. He has been involved in numerous archaeological excavations in Israel. Last year he began the fourth archaeological excavation at Lachish. Prior to that he directed the dig at Khirbet Qeiyafa, a site overlooking the Elah Valley where David fought Goliath, from 2007 to 2013.

Garfinkel identifies Khirbet Qeiyafa as Biblical Shaaraim (Joshua 15:36; 1 Samuel 17:52; 1 Chronicles 4:31). He identifies two large buildings dating to the Iron Age at Khirbet Qeiyafa as a palace of David and a royal storeroom. We reported on this identification with photos here.

I think it is still impossible to say if Garfinkel’s identifications are correct, but I can say that his presentation will be interesting and enlightening. I have heard him speak at the Society of Biblical Literature annual meetings.

Florida College — Temple Terrace, FL
Puckett Auditorium
Tuesday, November 18 — 7:30 p.m.

This presentation is part of the Life Enrichment program at Florida College. These programs are intended primarily for students, faculty and staff of Florida College, but there should be some seats available for visitors who are interested in the subject.