Paul worked 18 months at Corinth

Paul first visited Corinth during his second preaching journey (A.D. 50-53; Acts 15:36-18:22). After facing opposition of his fellow Jews in Thessalonica and Berea, the brethren at Berea conducted him to the sea and to Athens, the intellectual capital of the Greco-Roman world.

Paul was alone in Athens, but he had sent for Timothy and Silas to come to him immediately from Berea. After what might be considered limited success at Athens, Paul continued to Corinth in the Peloponnesus. Paul stayed at Corinth for 18 months according to Luke’s account in Acts 18.

During that time he was brought before Gallio. The site of this encounter was likely before the bema, the judgement-seat, in the agora. The photo reflects one of the important things we saw today at Corinth. The foundation of the bema is seen in the left of the photo. The Acrocorinth, the high point of the city, is in the distance.

Corinth. The Bema in the Agora. Acrocorinth in distance. Photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

The Bema in the Agora of Corinth. Photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

Numerous changes are taking place all over Europe at popular tourist destinations. I first noticed it a few years ago when the bus driver had to park a distance from the center of activity in Salzburg, Austria. Everyone had to walk a considerable distance to reach the place where the walking normally began. Then I saw it in Florence and Rome. Now it is true in Athens and Corinth. Buses are required to drive a long distance out of the way to reach the parking at Corinth.

At the site we now see rope barriers preventing one from walking close to the columns of the Temple of Apollo, or approaching the Fountain of Peirene, or the Bema. I understand that these restricting are imposed by the European Union on their member states.

Visiting anywhere in the world takes longer than it did a few decades ago due to the tremendous increase in traffic.

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