Tabgha on the Sea of Galilee

Sacred Destinations describes Tabgha in these words:

Tabgha (also spelled Tabhka) is not a city, but a small area on the northwest shore of the Sea of Galilee, not far from Capernaum. In ancient times, Tabgha was known as Heptapegon – “Place of the Seven Springs.” These seven springs produce warm water, which increases the production of algae in this part of the lake, which attracts more fish. Fisherman have thus flocked to Heptapegon for thousands of years.

By the 4th century AD, Heptapegon had become a popular place for Byzantine pilgrims to rest and have their picnics, thanks to its shady trees and excellent fishing. It is probably not coincidence that two of the three pilgrimage destinations in this relate to abundant food: the miracle of the loaves and fishes during Jesus’ Galilean ministry and a lakeside fish breakfast after Jesus’ resurrection.

For more information read here. Sacred Destination is a nice site to use in locating brief info about biblical sites in Israel and other countries.

Today we spent some time again in the Hula Valley. This time on the ground instead of in the air. As we returned to Tiberias we noted that the air around the Sea of Galilee had cleared considerably since this morning. A wonderful scene presented itself as we approached Tabgha.

The view in our photo shows the church at Tabgha from the North West. Look carefully and you will see the Northeastern portion of the Sea of Galilee, the shore, and the biblical area known as Bashan. In New Testament times the region was known as the land of the Gerasenes.

Then they sailed to the country of the Gerasenes, which is opposite Galilee. (Luke 8:26 ESV)

Then all the people of the surrounding country of the Gerasenes asked him to depart from them, for they were seized with great fear. So he got into the boat and returned. (Luke 8:37 ESV)

Tabgha on the NW corner of Sea of Galilee. Photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

Tabgha on the NW corner of Sea of Galilee. Photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

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