Ancient sunken treasure returned to Israel Antiquities Authority

It really happened. A lady in Poriya Illit, a village a short distance from the western shore of the southern tip of the Sea of Galilee, called the Israel Antiquities Authority. She told them that a now-deceased family member had “fished” some treasures from the Mediterranean. It was packed in her basement, but she wanted it to be in a museum so her grandchildren would be able to see it in due time. The information below comes from an article by Roz Wolberger in The Jerusalem Post Online Edition here.

Soon after the phone call, two archaeologists from the IAA arrived at Lester’s Galilee home and were amazed to see the extent of the treasure: wrapped in cloth and stacked in boxes were a large number of whole pottery vessels, clearly very ancient and rare. The surface of the vases were encrusted with sea shells and other ocean sediments, including the occasional fossil. Most of the pieces were fully intact, and the rest were in large fragments, neatly wrapped in fabric.

The cache of artifacts came from a wide variety of periods.

An especially beautiful vase with a tall frame and high handles was immediately recognized as being from the time of the Biblical period, about 3000 years ago. Another remarkable piece was reported to be from the Roman period, some 2000 years ago, and yet another round urn was dated to the Byzantine period, about 1500 years ago

Sunken treasure from the Mediterranean. Photo: Israel Antiquities Authority

Sunken treasure from the Mediterranean. Photo: Israel Antiquities Authority

I think the vase with “a tall frame and high handles” is the second from the right in both photos. My guess is that the lady in the photo above is with the IAA.

Sunken treasure from the Mediterranean. Photo: Israel Antiquities Authority

Sunken treasure from the Mediterranean. Photo: Israel Antiquities Authority

HT: Joseph Lauer

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One response to “Ancient sunken treasure returned to Israel Antiquities Authority

  1. It is so good that these artifacts gets to go to a museum for all’s enjoyment, not like the scourge of private collectors just keeping it for themselves…

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