Acts 27 — Photo Illustrations — Myra in Lycia

Myra was a town of Lycia about 85 miles west of Antalya, Turkey (biblical Attalia, Acts 14:25). The town is located about two miles inland from the Mediterranean, but has a port at nearby Andriake. When Paul was being escorted by a Roman centurion from Caesarea Maritima to Rome, the ship sailed along the coast of Cilicia and Pamphylia, and landed at Myra in Lycia (Acts 27:5). There they found an Alexandrian ship sailing for Italy. This was one of the many grain ships that used Andriake as a port (Acts 27:38).

We do not know whether Paul was able to see any of Myra. There are several interesting things that could have been seen.

Here is a photo of the house-type tombs in the rock cliffs at Myra dating from the 4th century B.C.

Fourth century B.C. house-type rock tombs at Myra. Photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

Fourth century B.C. house-type rock tombs at Myra. Photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

The next photo shows the top seats of the 2nd century B.C. theater with the tombs in the background. The theater seated about 10,000 spectators.

Rock tombs of Myra with Theater in the foreground. Photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

Rock Tombs of Myra with Theater in the foreground. Photo by Ferrell Jenkins.

Our last photo shows the harbor at Andriake, and walls of granaries built in the time of the Roman Emperor Hadrian (A.D. 117-138).  This was an ideal place to find a grain ship headed for Rome, even before Hardian built the granaries.

Anriake, the harbor of Myra, Photo by Ferrell Jenkins

Anriake, the harbor of Myra, Photo by Ferrell Jenkins

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2 responses to “Acts 27 — Photo Illustrations — Myra in Lycia

  1. The rock tombs are amazing. I would like to visit there some day.

  2. this is beautiful!

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